Contemporary style, keeping it simple

Juliet Fishenden

We have been looking into how we can show off our classic wrought iron curtain poles to their best advantage. There are so many ways to dress a window space we have decided to go for a contemporary, subtle material to achieve a distinctive, luxurious look.

If big bold patterns are not your thing and you are looking for a cool understated look in your interior then you can’t go wrong with a good quality fabric with an interesting texture or pattern. For simplicity I love the Ishida collection from Designers Guild which has a large colour palette and a variety of textures, from a tweedy chenille weave to one with a lustrous sheen.
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For something with a bit of fun there is a playful dotted design from Harlequin fabrics – Artisan Embroideries collection – Bobbin. Shown below in Toast/Linen and Eggshell but is also available in bright raspberry/lime and turquoise if you want to be bold, it would look great with strong paint colours! The artisan quality would go perfectly with our handmade iron curtain poles and a Cannon Ball or Button finial.
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Layering your window fabrics can work well, we can make special brackets and poles to hold a light sheer curtain behind your main curtains. Harlequin fabrics has a range called Momentum Sheers and Structures II – Noa in graphite is particularly striking.
https://www.harlequin.uk.com/shop/fabric/momentum-sheers-and-structures-ii/noa/?code=HMOH131503
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We are always pleased to see any photos of the fabrics you have used or are considering using. So please do share your images and thoughts.

Juliet Fishenden
Juliet Fishenden

Here, you’ll find a news feed straight from the forge written by myself, Juliet, Richard’s wife and business partner. Richard and I love beautiful, hand crafted objects so design is a hugely important aspect of our company. We’re thrilled to be working with a variety of British designers such as Anthony Dickens and Chris Eckersley. It’s here you’ll find updated product information as well as personal observations about Richard’s craft.

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